Valencia Cathedral


Right at the heart of Valencia city centre is La Seu (the see) also known by its formal name, the Cathedral of Santa María of Valencia. It is the current seat of the Archbishop of Valencia.

The cathedral we see today was completed on 22 June 1262, having been built on the ruins of Valencia’s first cathedral which dated back to the 6th century in the Visigoth period. What stands out now, though, is a strong Gothic influence, although one can still glimpse some Baroque and Renaissance features.

The interior houses the famous Holy Chalice that dates back to the 1st century and that was given to the cathedral by King Alfonso V of Aragon, ‘the Magnanimous’, in 1436. It is an object of worship and veneration widely recognised as the true Holy Grail, attracting Christians and tourists from every corner of the world. Inside, visitors can see not only the old chapter house or chapel of the Holy Chalice, but also the dome (a masterpiece of Gothic architecture); the ambulatory, in Valencian Gothic style; the altar and the presbytery, with its Renaissance paintings; and the main and side naves, also in Valencian Gothic style.

The exterior also has some unique features such as the eastern door, the little chapel of Sant Jordi, the Obra Nova arcade, the Apostles door, the bell tower known as Micalet and the Baroque Los Hierros door.

And distributed around the walls are some of the first and best paintings of the Quattrocento to be found anywhere on the Iberian Peninsula. They came from Rome and were painted by artists commissioned by the Valencian Pope Alexander VI.

If you wish, you can park your vehicle nearby in one of our Saba public car parks in Valencia Nord Train Station, at 24 Calle Xàtiva. This is our closest car park to the city centre, and from here you can enjoy a walk around Valencia.